Blasting for East End Bridge to cause traffic delays - WDRB 41 Louisville News

Blasting for East End Bridge to cause traffic delays

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Blasting for the East End Bridge project will shut down traffic at U.S. 42 and the Gene Snyder Freeway for 5 to 20 minutes at a time. Blasting for the East End Bridge project will shut down traffic at U.S. 42 and the Gene Snyder Freeway for 5 to 20 minutes at a time.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- Blasting started on Thursday afternoon for part of the East End Bridge project.

Each blast will shut down traffic at U.S. 42 and the Gene Snyder Freeway for several minutes; however, drivers will get a warning before that happens.

The blasts are very faint and will happen as crews work on a new tunnel for the bridge.

"I think it'll be wonderful just to have us, to be able to go to Indiana easier.  We have parents and we have teachers that come from Indiana and work here," said Diane Deitel, Head of School at Prospect Latin on U.S. 42.

Deitel says the new East End Bridge will make life a lot easier for her staff and parents, but knows it comes with a price: construction and delays. That's why she wants her people to be prepared.

"I would just probably make sure people are aware of what time the blasting is taking place so that they can plan their day," Deitel said.

Thursday afternoon, crews initiated the first of many blasts. They will require traffic adjustments at U.S. 42 and the Gene Snyder Freeway.

"Somewhere between 5 minutes and 20 minutes before a blast, traffic will be shut down in all areas leading up to the blast sites," said Dan Hartlage, with Guthrie Mayes.

Before each blast, both motorists and neighbors will get a warning.

"Five minutes prior to each blast there will be three long horns that will be heard, the sound of air horns and then one minute prior there will be three short air horns will be heard," said Hartlage.

The blasting will happen during off-peak hours and people who live and drive in the area should hear it, but crews say there's no need to be concerned.

"They're well aware that the blast will be going on but there's no need for them to take any precautions like that,"  said Hartlage.

And that's why Diane Deitel is not worried about the blasting or even the construction delays.

"Most of the time it won't effect people, it's just maybe if they have a special appointment that they want to take their child to," Deitel said.

Crews expect the blasting portion of the project to continue into next year. To find out the blasting schedule for each week, click here.

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