Massive bee colony found inside Louisville home - WDRB 41 Louisville News

Massive bee colony found inside Louisville home

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A Louisville man discovered this colony of 30,000 bees under the siding of his home. A Louisville man discovered this colony of 30,000 bees under the siding of his home.
Tyler Chesser says he first noticed the bees in mid-June. Tyler Chesser says he first noticed the bees in mid-June.
A bee keeper removed the bees and took them to safety. A bee keeper removed the bees and took them to safety.

LOUISVILLE, Ky (WDRB) -- A massive colony of bees was found building a hive in a Louisville man's basement ceiling.

Tyler Chesser says at least 30,000 bees had formed a colony in a 4-foot space inside the walls of his home. Now, after a 3-week removal process, he hopes they're all gone.

Chesser first noticed the bees in mid-June.

"I was mowing the grass and noticed a huge swarm of bees coming in and out," said Chesser.

He didn't think much of it until a few days later when he found more bees in his basement.

That's when he called a beekeeper.

"He comes out and looks at it and says, 'yeah, you have a big problem,'" Chesser recalled.

Chesser says it took the beekeeper a total of 12 hours over three weeks to remove the hive. The beekeeper had to cut out the ceiling to expose and remove the 30,000 bees.

Chesser captured photos of part of the process, but says he didn't stick around for the dirty work.

"It was one of the most nerve wracking things I've done," Chesser said. "You walked in there and it was literally like a tattoo parlor -- buzzing everywhere -- and you're like OK, I gotta get out of here."

So why did the bees decide to set up shop in Chesser's home?

"Inside my brick and my vinyl siding, there was a small gap, a tiny gap. We had to seal that off with some foam and fiberglass and ... I don't know, they just found their way in, and it's a safe spot for them."

He's now working to patch all the holes he can find in his siding.

He says it was a stressful experience but there was one advantage.

"It was a 4-foot by 2-foot space where they had built five or six honeycombs and you pull it out and it's literally dripping in honey," said Chesser.

So the beekeeper took the bees to safety and Tyler got to keep the honey as a memento, or maybe just to enjoy.

"Local honey is good for your allergies so I'll look at it that way," Chesser said. "That's the only positive out of it."

If you think you have a bee infestation, you're encouraged to call the Kentuckiana Beekeepers Association.

They will do a professional removal and say the sooner they're discovered the better.

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