9/11 fire truck makes permanent home at Ft. Knox - WDRB 41 Louisville News

9/11 fire truck makes permanent home at Ft. Knox

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This fire truck shielded firefighters from falling debris from the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. It will now be on permanent display at the Patton Museum in Ft. Knox. This fire truck shielded firefighters from falling debris from the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. It will now be on permanent display at the Patton Museum in Ft. Knox.
People along Dixie Hwy. had an opportunity to take photos of the restored fire truck. People along Dixie Hwy. had an opportunity to take photos of the restored fire truck.
People in Radcliff raised American flags as the restored fire truck that survived the 9/11 attack at the Pentagon made its journey to Ft. Knox. People in Radcliff raised American flags as the restored fire truck that survived the 9/11 attack at the Pentagon made its journey to Ft. Knox.
Alan Wallace says 9/11 was an "intentional act of violence, and I want people to remember that there are people that continue to do our country harm and that as far as I'm concerned, this is never going to end." Alan Wallace says 9/11 was an "intentional act of violence, and I want people to remember that there are people that continue to do our country harm and that as far as I'm concerned, this is never going to end."

HARDIN COUNTY, Ky. (WDRB) -- A fire truck that was at the Pentagon on September 11 has been partially refurbished and moved to Kentucky where it will remain on permanent display at the Patton Museum in Ft. Knox.

It's a day three men can retrieve from their memory almost instantly.

"Two-hundred yards away, approaching our position at a 45-degree angle is the airplane, American Airlines flight 77," recalled retired firefighter Alan Wallace. It was Sept. 11, 2001, the day terrorists caught America off-guard, the day a plane came hurtling into the Pentagon. The day firefighters Alan Wallace, Dennis Young, and Mark Skipper were working their regular shift at the department of defense headquarters.

"As soon as we see the airplane and not before, we are immediately involved in this incredibly loud noise and almost immediately the plane has hit the building," said Wallace. 

Wallace says the truck blocked debris and fire -- saving their lives and allowing them to save others.

"It wasn't anything heroic," Wallace said. "The heroic thing was the Lord that didn't allow us to die that day, he allowed us to be in a position to help others."

And now people hundreds of miles away from the attack lined the streets to say thank you as the truck made its way to its new permanent home at the Patton Museum in Ft. Knox. 

"Being a veteran, being a paramedic, being a nurse, it just means a lot," said Rick Nickoson.

Patriotism flying high, many lined Dixie Highway in Hardin County and raised their flags. "We haven't forgotten and we still remember and we won't forget," said Trisha Baker. 

As Foam 161 -- as they call it -- was welcomed into Kentucky, the heroes got to see their rescue vehicle for the first time since that fateful day, knowing that this tragedy probably won't be the last.

"This was an intentional act of violence, and I want people to remember that there are people that continue to do our country harm and that as far as I'm concerned, this is never going to end," said Wallace.

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