Former probation officer defends David Camm in new book - WDRB 41 Louisville News

Former probation officer defends David Camm in new book

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In his new book, former probation officer William Abbott defends David Camm, who was recently acquitted of the murders of his wife and two children. In his new book, former probation officer William Abbott defends David Camm, who was recently acquitted of the murders of his wife and two children.

FLOYD COUNTY, Ind.  (WDRB) -- A retired Floyd County probation officer says he discovered David Camm was an innocent man years ago.

After 13 years, David Camm was cleared of murder in a court of law; however, that's not the case in the court of public opinion.

William Abbott has written a short book that he hopes will change opinions. 

"I really don't know David Camm that well," said Abbott. 

He may not know David Camm that well, but Abbott says he does know a lot about the case that put Camm in prison for 13 years.

"I started off writing a book about me and what I did down there for 32 years and I detoured off to David Camm.  I just got to adding 2 and 2 and didn't get to 4," Abbot explained.

Camm was recently acquitted of the murders of his wife and two children in the garage of their Georgetown, Indiana home in September of 2000. Now, Abbott hopes his book will change the court of public opinion.

"It's basically short and to the point. And if you read it you're going to think, 'hey, maybe this man isn't guilty,'" said Abbott.

In the book, Abbott accuses Camm's first prosecutor, Stan Faith, of a rush to judgment.

"I just think Stan Strong armed it through."

Abbott says he ran a diversion program for Faith and even worked with Camm while he was still with Indiana State Police. 

"I asked David Camm to do our DWI classes and Stan got very upset when I told him State Police were not going to do it as long as he had the diversion," explained Abbott.

Abbott says at a recent book signings the tone changed when he shared his opinion about the case: "As soon as I told them I felt David Camm was not guilty, 90 percent said he was guilty and walked off."

Despite public opinion, Camm is a free man, and he walked out of the Boone County Courthouse last week after a jury acquitted him. 

Since then, he has shared a few pictures and even sent a Facebook message to his family and supporters saying, "I am choosing to move forward. I don't want to be consumed by the past."

And he points out things he never thought he would do-- drink a fresh cup of coffee, watch a 60-inch flat screen television and listen to music on his new iPhone.

Abbott's book will be released on December 17.  You can read Camm's entire letter here.

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