WV water to reach Louisville Friday; officials say no threat to - WDRB 41 Louisville News

WV water to reach Louisville Friday; officials say no threat to health

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The water from the chemical spill in West Virginia is expected to reach Louisville Friday morning -- but Louisville Water Company officials say there is no health threat. The water from the chemical spill in West Virginia is expected to reach Louisville Friday morning -- but Louisville Water Company officials say there is no health threat.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- The water from the chemical spill in West Virginia is expected to reach Louisville Friday morning -- but Louisville Water Company officials say there is no health threat.

"This incident does not pose a health concern and will not impact the quality of Louisville's drinking water.   The plume will pass quickly through Louisville – in about 24 hours – at levels of between 5 and 20 parts per billion (ppb) in the Ohio River.  However, Louisville's drinking water should contain no detectable traces of MCHM," said a statement from the Louisville Water Co. late Thursday afternoon.

"We've talked to all of the utilities through ORSANCO, up and down the river," said Kelley Dearing Smith of the Louisville Water Co. "Some view treatment a little differently. There may be utilities not going to the extremes that we're going to, or maybe Cincinnati goes to."

ORSANCO is a group made up of eight member states, including Kentucky and Indiana, dedicated to improving water quality in the Ohio River. That group is continuing to test water samples.

Indiana American Water says its customers will not be affected, since the company uses only groundwater which comes from wells as a water source.

In Ashland and Russell, Ky., utility companies temporarily shut off their intakes early Monday as the plume passed in the Ohio River.

The state of Kentucky said the level of the chemical was well below the amount federal officials say would be acceptable in drinking water.

"We have no indication that there have been, or will be, issues or risks to Kentucky residents," said Ky. Dept. for Environmental Protection Commissioner R. Bruce Scott in a statement late Thursday afternoon.

Water officials in Henderson and Louisville say the chemical will dilute and will be treated by their facilities.

Kroger is stocking up on bottled water in Louisville and southern Indiana, just in case.

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