Louisville residents remember tornado outbreak - WDRB 41 Louisville News

Louisville residents remember tornado outbreak

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LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- 40 years ago this past week, tornadoes ripped across 13 states killing more than 300 people. It's known as the Super Outbreak. 

In Louisville, 3 people lost their lives in the storm and hundreds were injured. On Saturday, a ceremony was held to look back at the unforgettable day.

People met at Kennedy Park and St. Mark's Episcopal Church to look at photos and talk about the devastation that occurred on April 3, 1974.

"In 90 seconds there were 10,000 trees. It looked like there was a mower or something that went over," says Harvey Sloane, who was Mayor at the time of the tornadoes.

Sloane recalls trees and telephone poles down in neighborhoods.

Homes were destroyed by the tornado, and cars flipped over.

"It started at the fairgrounds and flattened all the horse barns," says Harvey Sloane.

On Saturday, residents gathered at Kennedy Park in the Crescent Hill neighborhood, to share photos and remember the unforgettable day.

It was once the site of a 19th century mansion. The home was destroyed by the tornado and had to be torn down. Three years later, Kennedy Park was dedicated.

Many of the people at the event on Saturday have their own personal stories from the storm.  

"And as I was driving towards Crescent Hill the skies were dark, the tornado was passing through and I was to zig-zag to get home on Peterson," says Allan Steinberg.

Allan Steinberg says after seeing the tornado he found out about the damage by listening to the radio.

"I was listening to a helicopter report and the helicopter attendant was saying I'm over Cherokee Park and the park looks like toothpicks, and my heart just sank," says Allan Steinberg.

"Then you start seeing telephone poles down and trees down and then I knew the reality, he wasn't joking. It was a tornado. It was the big one," says Steve Imhoff.  

It a day Allen Steinberg says, those that survived, will always remember.

"It's sort of hard to believe you can have such an imprint on your mind of 40 years, but it is there and will be there forever," says Allan Steinberg.

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