Arrest warrant reveals more details on Snyder shooting - WDRB 41 Louisville News

Arrest warrant reveals more details on Snyder shooting

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Jasmin Osmanovic, 23, turned himself into police at headquarters in downtown Louisville around 4 p.m. Wednesday after police issued a warrant for his arrest on Tuesday. Jasmin Osmanovic, 23, turned himself into police at headquarters in downtown Louisville around 4 p.m. Wednesday after police issued a warrant for his arrest on Tuesday.
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- The suspect wanted in connection with a shooting on the Gene Snyder Freeway near the Smyrna exit has turned himself in, and on Thursday morning, WDRB News obtained an arrest warrant with new information on how the shooting took place.

Jasmin Osmanovic, 23, turned himself into police at headquarters in downtown Louisville around 4 p.m. Wednesday after police issued a warrant for his arrest on Tuesday.

According to an arrest warrant, the victim's 11-year-old son was sitting in the front seat of the car when bullet traveled through the car door, past the child, and struck the victim. A 12-year-old child was in the back seat of the car. The children were not injured.

The driver of the car was struck in the arm and chest. He was treated at the hospital and released, but police say the bullet remains lodged in his chest after doctors were unable to remove it. 

According to the arrest warrant, investigators determined that Osmanovic was in the back yard of a home near the freeway when he fired a .45 caliber handgun two times, aiming the gun towards I-265.

WDRB talked to the owner of Open Range Sports in Crestwood, Barry Laws, who is very familiar with .45 caliber guns. Laws says Osmanovic could have been using a wide variety of .45 caliber guns.

Police won't say how far Osmanovic was from the freeway when he fired, but Law said a .45 caliber could travel over a mile.

"It depends where you're shooting. In the air, on the ground, they do have a certain drop to them but at a certain point, everything is too far if you aren't shooting in a safe direction," he said, adding that even shooting in a certain direction, at a specific target doesn't guarantee safety. "Just because you're shooting that way, doesn't mean you won't have a discharge the other way."

Like all guns, Laws says it never should have been shot in a neighborhood, especially if the shooter was without an intended target.

"If you're going to shoot outdoors, absolutely know your property," he said. "And if it's a flat property, know what's a mile, two miles behind that tree you think your hitting."

Osmanovic has past criminal convictions in Jefferson County including assault, wanton endangerment, trafficking marijuana and D-U-I.

When asked how someone with a lengthy criminal history such as Osmanovic would legally buy a gun, Laws said through the federal background check system you don't get access to someone's history, instead it just says whether you can sell to them or not.

Police say Osmanovic told a witness, described as a friend of Osmanovic's, he needed to get rid of the gun and leave the state. According to the arrest warrant, the witness told police Osmanovic had often visited his home in the past.

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