First person brought to the United States to be treated for Ebol - WDRB 41 Louisville News

First person brought to the United States to be treated for Ebola speaks in Louisville

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Dr. Kent Brantly Dr. Kent Brantly
Dr. Kent Brantly on the panel with other doctors participating in the conference. Dr. Kent Brantly on the panel with other doctors participating in the conference.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- Doctor Kent Brantly was the first person infected with Ebola to be brought to the united states for treatment and, on Friday, he spoke in Louisville about his experience.

Dr. Brantly is a speaker at the Global Missions Health Conference at Southeast Christian Church. He's talking about his experience dealing with Ebola himself and treating others with the virus.

"Challenging to say the least. Physically, emotionally, spiritually, psychologically. Its a horrible, terrible, humiliating, dignity-stripping disease," Dr. Brantly said.

Dr. Brantly contracted Ebola --- the virus he worked tirelessly to treat as a missionary in West Africa -- in July. He hopes the role reversal from doctor to patient, will make him a better physician.

"I put myself in their shoes and try to comfort them in that way and i see it from a totally new perspective now," he explained.

While it is a deadly virus and it's seriousness shouldn't be taken lightly, Dr. Brantly and fellow missionaries say the irrational fear of Ebola is based on a lack of understanding.

"You don't get Ebola from somebody who is well enough to be going to the supermarket. You have to have intimate contact with that person or you have to be caring for someone that's dying from Ebola," Brantly said.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there have been 4 cases of Ebola diagnosed in the united states. Three in Texas and one in New York. Of those 4 only 1 person has died.

Dr. Brantly is from Indianapolis, but hopes to one day return to Africa and complete his mission work.

Other topics at the conference include human trafficking and using drones to deliver medicine to remote parts of the world.

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