Ky. House panel passes bill to help fight Internet crimes agains - WDRB 41 Louisville News

Ky. House panel passes bill to help fight Internet crimes against children

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FRANKFORT, Ky. (WDRB) -- Kentucky State Police call child pornography and sex trafficking Kentucky's fastest growing crimes. In fact, KSP has a special unit dedicated to fighting Internet crimes against children.

The problem, police say, is there is not enough funding.

The Kentucky State Police has five investigators whose positions are dedicated to the online tracking of the most awful images imaginable; including the rape and torture of children. The five officers are trying to combat what may be Kentucky's fastest growing crime.

“We had nearly 10,000 child pornography files that were downloaded last year in Kentucky alone,” said Kentucky State Police Commissioner Rodney Brewer.

What's even more alarming, says Brewer, is the number they don't find.

Now there is a proposal designed to help.

“House Bill 427 is about is about protecting our commonwealth's most vulnerable citizens,” said Rep. Sannie Overly (D-Paris.)

The bill would add a $10 court fee to all criminal convictions, with the money going directly to fighting child pornography.

“The money would be dedicated to personnel, equipment and training solely for the State Police,” said Rep. John Tilley (D-Hopkinsville).

The bill is called "Alicia's Law", named after Alicia Kozakiewicz. She was abducted by an Internet stalker at age 13, bound, raped and tortured live on the Internet.

“But I was miraculously rescued because of the FBI; because they had the funding and the resources to find and rescue me,” Kozakiewicz told WDRB News.

Alicia now crosses the country pushing for bills like the one in Kentucky.

“Law enforcement has to watch this everyday. And they have to say, 'I can't save you because I don't have the funding, I don't have the manpower, I don't have the resources.' And that's what Alicia's Law will give,” she said.

The bill easily passed the House Judiciary Committee and now goes on to the full House and the Senate.

If the bill becomes law, sponsors say it could raise some $3 million to help prevent future Alicias.

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