Students, Metro Council members press LMPD Chief on recent murde - WDRB 41 Louisville News

Students, Metro Council members press LMPD Chief on recent murders

Posted: Updated:
Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad answered questions from Metro council's Public Safety committee about the city's 21 homicides. Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad answered questions from Metro council's Public Safety committee about the city's 21 homicides.
Jonathan Neal and Alisha Williams have sent letters to city leaders about the growing issue. Jonathan Neal and Alisha Williams have sent letters to city leaders about the growing issue.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- Louisville Metro Council members are looking for answers after 21 murders in just two months, 10 of which remain unsolved.

In addition to police and metro council, some of the city's youngest residents are also starting to take notice.

"It goes through my mind every day," said Jonathan Neal, Central High School.

Sixteen-year-olds Jonathan Neal and Alisha Williams are sophomores at Central High School and, instead of just focusing on school, they're concerned about the ongoing violence in Metro Louisville and across the country.

“I just worry about my family,” Alisha Williams said.

"We've realized that the police brutality and the 21 homicides are just too much violence and it's kids killing kids and we're not speaking up about it,” said Neal.

That all changed this week.

"We want to start a movement throughout the nation," he said.

The movement starts with a letter Neal is sending to police, city leaders and other youth.

Part of it read, "I am a 16-year old resident who attends Central High School, and I am writing to ask for your full support in the All Lives Matter Movement."

The students hope the movement will spread and help end some of the recent violence. Both say they live in fear and know people who have lost loved ones.

"A member at my church, two of her sons got gunned down,” Neal said.

"It is just the environment scares me because I could be walking out to the car and someone will probably be over here at Village West or Beecher Terrace shooting or something," said Williams.

Monday afternoon, Police Chief Steve Conrad answered questions from Metro council's Public Safety committee about the city's 21 homicides.

"I think they were really specifically interested in what we are experiencing, what we can do about it and how they can help,” Chief Conrad said.

Conrad says LMPD is focusing on crimes in the First and Second Divisions which include the Russell and Shawnee Neighborhoods. He says they account for 74 percent of the shootings.

Conrad said Operation Trust was launched last month and involves the Viper Unit along with the FBI, U.S. Marshal's Office and ATF.

Conrad admits there is gang activity in Louisville, but doesn't believe it's connected to the murders.

"In terms of the recent increase in crime or homicides -- and one of the councilwomen asked me about these questions -- we have not seen a direct connection between the gangs and the homicides. We have seen some connections between the gangs and the non-fatal shootings," said Conrad.

The students will also meet with Chief Conrad on Wednesday of this week at Central High School.

And next month, they'll share the plan with the community on April 4th at King Solomon Baptist Church in west Louisville. The meeting is scheduled to start at 11 a.m.

Copyright 2015 WDRB News. All rights reserved.

Powered by Frankly
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2017 WDRB. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, and Terms of Service, and Ad Choices.