Religious Freedom Restoration Act still creating controversy in - WDRB 41 Louisville News

Religious Freedom Restoration Act still creating controversy in Indiana

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There have been protests and calls for clarification over Indiana's controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act. There have been protests and calls for clarification over Indiana's controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act.
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- There have been protests and calls for clarification over Indiana's controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act. Thousands of people are still upset after Indiana Governor Mike Pence signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act into law last week. Republican lawmakers are now adding new language to clarify that it doesn't allow for discrimination against gays and lesbians.

"We don't believe that anyone should be discriminated against," said David Long, the Indiana Senate President Pro Tempore, who is a Republican. "We wouldn't support this law if we thought that was the effect of it, to the extent that we need to clarify that by adding something to the law to make that clearer that it's not the intent of the law, we're more than willing to do it and we plan to do that."

"If Republicans want a fix, there's only one choice and this is...repeal this law," said Senator Tim Lanane, a Democrat. Democratic lawmakers feel that's the only way to stop the widespread criticism.

He also says, "Unfortunately the Republican leadership has utterly failed in their handling of the situations. The Governor and republican leaders won't say it, but we will. Discrimination is wrong and it should be illegal."

Pence defended the measure during a television appearance Sunday and didn't directly answer questions about whether it allowed discrimination against gays and lesbians. The act prohibits state laws that "substantially burden" a person's ability to follow their religious beliefs.

Pence says, "It does not apply to disputes between individuals unless government action is involved."

Angie's List is now rethinking its expansion proposal in Indianapolis that would've created 1,000 jobs and Apple is against the law.

Indiana University is also voicing concerns.

"I want to reassure the entire Indiana University community … that each and every one of you is welcome and appreciated for the unique qualities that you bring to our community," said IU President Michael McRobbie. "We are all better as a result of our shared experiences."

Hanover College, which is Governor Pence's alma mater, had a similar statement. In it, Hanover's president says the governor should honor the values of the school which includes "acceptance and openness to all persons."

Some worry this controversy could effect of the Final Four in Indy this weekend.

Several NBA stars have come out against holding the championship there - including Reggie Miller and Charles Barkley.

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