Supporters, protesters gather as Supreme Court arguments conclud - WDRB 41 Louisville News

Supporters, protesters gather as Supreme Court arguments conclude in same-sex marriage case

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Six Kentucky couples are among the plaintiffs in a case that will decide the future of gay marriage across the country. Six Kentucky couples are among the plaintiffs in a case that will decide the future of gay marriage across the country.
While the arguments inside the courtroom will focus on the Fourteenth Amendment, we're also keep an eye on thing outside where protesters have gathered to exercise their first amendment right of free speech. While the arguments inside the courtroom will focus on the Fourteenth Amendment, we're also keep an eye on thing outside where protesters have gathered to exercise their first amendment right of free speech.
The couples from Kentucky have brought their case all the way to Washington to challenge Kentucky's gay marriage ban. The Kentucky plaintiffs join others from Ohio, Tennessee and Michigan. The couples from Kentucky have brought their case all the way to Washington to challenge Kentucky's gay marriage ban. The Kentucky plaintiffs join others from Ohio, Tennessee and Michigan.
Does the Fourteenth Amendment require a state to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples? Does the Fourteenth Amendment require states to recognize gay marriages performed in other states? Does the Fourteenth Amendment require a state to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples? Does the Fourteenth Amendment require states to recognize gay marriages performed in other states?
There are strong opinions on both sides. There are strong opinions on both sides.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- The United States Supreme Court has heard arguments for and against Kentucky's gay marriage ban and now history waits to be written.

Supporters came by the hundreds to take a stand for gay marriage while protesters lined up beside them to voice their opinion.

"To be here today when this is all coming together is just really the culmination of a dream," one supporter said.

"It's important to stand up for the moral issue of marriage, which is between a man and a woman," a protester said.

Inside, six Kentucky plaintiffs joined others from Ohio, Michigan and Tennessee as the Supreme Court heard arguments for two-and-a-half hours.

"To have to fight for it is kind of odd, but guess what: we're willing to do it," Kentucky plaintiff Tim Love said after the hearings.

"Our case will be part of history and will go down as part of history," another Kentucky plaintiff, Kim Franklin, said outside the Supreme Court.

The nine justices heard arguments on two questions relating to the Fourteenth Amendment's equal protection clause:

Do states have the right to issue same sex marriage licenses?

Should gay marriages performed in other states be recognized?

Just five selected lawyers argued these points as they were peppered with questions from the justices.

"This definition has been with us for millennia and it's very difficult for the Court to say, 'Oh well, we know better'," Justice Anthony Kennedy said during the proceedings.

Lawyers for the plaintiffs say the Fourteenth Amendment guarantees equality under the law and, without gay marriage allowed in every state, it opens up our country to a repeated history of segregation. The attorneys argued it is the duty of the Supreme Court to decide what the Fourteenth Amendment requires.

"This isn't about state versus federal, this is about the individual and the individual versus their government," plaintiff's attorney Laura Landenwich countered.

There was even a courtroom outburst from an anti-gay marriage advocate

The attorneys who argued in favor of upholding the state bans say it should not be up to the court to change the definition of marriage, that the people of each state should decide through the democratic process. Lawyers also argued changing the definition opens up the door for more children to be born out of wedlock.

Once it was over, a Louisville lawyer who was first to take on this case stopped to reflect outside.

"It's amazing, like, we had no idea. We were just trying to do something nice for our clients," plaintiff's attorney Shannon Fauver said afterwards. "We didn't realize we would be affecting everybody in the country."

The justices aren't expected to announce their decision until the end of June. So after Tuesday's excitement, now it's time to wait.

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