Councilman says state regulation keeping WWE from hosting big ev - WDRB 41 Louisville News

Councilman says state regulation keeping WWE from hosting big events in Louisville

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Pay-Per-View events like Wrestlemania bring in millions of dollars and send cities into a bidding war (Source: YouTube). Pay-Per-View events like Wrestlemania bring in millions of dollars and send cities into a bidding war (Source: YouTube).

LOUISVILLE, KY (WDRB) -- Pay-Per-View events like Wrestlemania bring in millions of dollars and send cities into a bidding war.

But a state regulation involving blood could be keeping top stars of World Wrestling Entertainment out of the state and costing Kentucky big time.

It's a town where “Horseplay is encouraged”, and “where heavy hitters come to play” – unless you're the WWE.

"The roadblock that's stopping us lies with the state," said Louisville Metro Councilman David James.

He wants the Kentucky Boxing and Wrestling Authority to change a regulation that says an event can be cancelled over a single drop of blood in the ring.

"We don't do that for basketball games, we don't do that for boxing matches, we don't do that for MMA matches, but for some reason we want to do that with WWE Wrestling," said James.

Some say that regulation keeps WWE from hosting Pay-Per-View events in Kentucky.

The WWE was here a couple weeks ago, but only for a house show. That's an event that doesn't draw the big crowds or all the big names people want to see.

According to the WWE's website, for the past three years, Wrestlemania has brought in more than $100 million in economic impact to its host city.

James says if the state does not make a change then Louisville and Lexington -- and other cities around Kentucky -- could lose out on millions of dollars as WWE would just go elsewhere like Indianapolis or Cincinnati.

Councilman James says the change is a no-brainer as it would keep money here and bring out pro wrestlers like Aron Haddad -- who performs as Damien Sandow.

Sandow trained in Louisville, a city that developed the company's biggest stars.

He says if the events are not televised, wrestlers are in and out of the city in less than a day, which doesn't give them time to do charity work with children through their "Be a Star” program.

"Which is a program that essentially has us go into schools and we're teaching kids the importance of showing tolerance and respect towards each other,” said Sandow. “We touch on issues like cyber-bullying and not being a bystander."

Issues that are important to kids.

“There is athletics involved in what we do, but we are a performance, we are a form of entertainment," said Sandow.

But unless the state regulation changes, live Pay-Per-View entertainment may be on hold.

We reached out to WWE and Kentucky Boxing and Wrestling Authority but have not heard back.

Related: Louisville pastor discusses history-making career as a pro wrestling manager

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