Clarksville Police using new technology to issue tickets - WDRB 41 Louisville News

Clarksville Police using new technology to issue tickets

Posted: Updated:
Nobody likes getting a ticket, but Clarksville Police have a new tool that gets you on your way much faster. Nobody likes getting a ticket, but Clarksville Police have a new tool that gets you on your way much faster.
The technology also allows officers to scan driver’s licenses and then print tickets instead of manually writing the citation. The technology also allows officers to scan driver’s licenses and then print tickets instead of manually writing the citation.

CLARKSVILLE, Ind. (WDRB) -- In nearly 10 years on the Clarksville Police Department, Cpl. Jason Tackett has had several close calls.

"I was involved in that, I fired one shot, I hit him," explained Cpl. Tackett.

That was in 2009, but Cpl. Tackett has also had deadly force used against him.

"I would have never assumed that he would have charged towards me and he hit me head on," he said.

It happened last year when a suspect rammed his police cruiser during a pursuit.

"It knocked me back about 30 yards from where I had pulled out, all the airbags in my vehicle deployed," Tackett said.

In his line of work, every second counts. That's why he is excited about the new ticket writing technology the department is using.

"It is very quick, you can write multiple citations per ticket," Cpl. Tackett said.

Nobody likes getting a ticket, but Clarksville Police have a new tool that gets you on your way much faster.

It is also safer for police. The new technology is inside police cruisers, it allows police to scan your license and in a matter of seconds it tells them if the person on the side of the road is wanted or considered dangerous.

The technology also allows officers to scan driver’s licenses and then print tickets instead of manually writing the citation.

"Anything in the car that's going to hurt me -- no guns, drugs, bombs, nuclear weapons, hand grenades anything like that?" Cpl. Jason Tackett asked a driver during a traffic stop.

Even if the driver doesn't reveal hidden dangers, the new system does in a matter of seconds.

"A lot of the officers here lately that have been assaulted or even killed on duty have been ambushed," Cpl. Tackett explained.

"It has become a world where you have to keep an eye out for everything around you and it is just increasingly getting more dangerous," said Clarksville Police Chief Mark Palmer.

Chief Palmer said the new system is meant to eliminate distractions and help officers keep their eyes on the road and person in the car in front of them.

"If we can take a little bit of that off of the officers where he can focus more on the primary person in front of him, then we are going to do so," said Palmer.

Copyright 2015 WDRB News. All rights reserved.

Powered by Frankly
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2017 WDRB. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, and Terms of Service, and Ad Choices.