Commercial drone pilots explain guidelines for use, regulations - WDRB 41 Louisville News

Commercial drone pilots explain guidelines for use, regulations

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Bryan Cherry says a number of different businesses have begun to use drones for legitimate purposes. Bryan Cherry says a number of different businesses have begun to use drones for legitimate purposes.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) – Bryan Cherry is the co-owner of a company called Two Guys and a Drone. He uses his drone for commercial purposes.

“Right now, real estate marketing videos,” Cherry said of some of the work he’s done lately. “I actually filmed a funeral for a guy when they did a balloon release and he wanted some aerial footage of that.”

But he says the process by which he had to go about getting proper authorization was not an easy one.

“I applied for my exemption in January, I got it in March,” Cherry said. “I was just waiting for that to go through before starting to go out and do stuff commercially.”

Cherry says a number of different businesses have begun to use drones for legitimate purposes.

“Insurance companies are using them for claims adjustments,” he said. “It prevents somebody from going up on a ladder and onto a roof. It's a lot safer.”

After a Hillview man shot down a drone on Sunday it sparked a nationwide conversation about privacy and how drones flown by amateurs should be regulated.

“I would say just follow some basic rules,” Cherry said of as advice to amateur fliers. “Don't fly over someone's house without their permission and you'll stay out of trouble."

If there is some sort of problem, Cherry urges homeowners to call police if they think the drone flying is up to no good. However, his concerns following the incident on Sunday centered around the future of his business.

“My main concern is there will be a knee jerk reaction from the legislature that will shut us down,” he said.

Cherry says he is under strict rules of what he can and can’t do while flying his drone.

“I can't fly at night. I can't fly above 500 feet. I can't fly above 200 without permission. I can't fly within 5 miles of an airport,” he said.

But those same restrictions don’t apply to amateur users. Instead, they are simply guidelines. Cherry says if all drone users would be abide by those guidelines then there would be very few complaints.

“Most people that have these just want to fly around, they don't want to spy on anything,” he added. 

Previous: Hillview man arrested for shooting down drone; cites right to privacy

Previous: Drone owner responds to claims of privacy invasion

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