Rural/Metro Ambulance looking for EMTs, offering free training - WDRB 41 Louisville News

Rural/Metro Ambulance looking for EMTs, offering free training

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Rural/Metro Ambulance -- a private service -- is expanding, and needs more EMTs. Rural/Metro Ambulance -- a private service -- is expanding, and needs more EMTs.
"We're offering free training for people interested in being EMTs so they can come in and work through the process and take a class at no charge," said Joe Meyer, General Manager of Rural/Metro Ambulance of Louisville. "We're offering free training for people interested in being EMTs so they can come in and work through the process and take a class at no charge," said Joe Meyer, General Manager of Rural/Metro Ambulance of Louisville.
Eric Burr is taking advantage of the free training to become an EMT and says he has always been interested in helping people. Eric Burr is taking advantage of the free training to become an EMT and says he has always been interested in helping people.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- EMTs wanted -- and there's no experience required. One company is ready to train people to work on the front lines of saving lives.

The job description for Emergency Medical Technicians might read: "saving lives."

EMTs are often the first on the scene to help people with life-threatening conditions. To become one takes 140 hours of training that normally costs nearly a thousand dollars.

But right now, it's free.

"We're offering free training for people interested in being EMTs so they can come in and work through the process and take a class at no charge," said Joe Meyer, General Manager of Rural/Metro Ambulance of Louisville.

Rural/Metro Ambulance -- a private service -- is expanding, and needs more EMTs. Company officials say turnout at an Aug. 18 job fair at its headquarters on Gilmore Industrial Blvd. was even better than expected.

Eric Burr was among the attendees.

"I've always been interested in an EMT position," Burr said. "I was in law enforcement years ago and want to work my way up to be a paramedic."

Applicants must pass a criminal background check and a drug test before they can begin training in the 7-week program.

"The vast majority of work is done in a classroom," Meyer said. "They learn about anatomy, they learn about physiology, they learn how to deal with life-threatening injuries, bleeding fracture care."

Rural Metro Ambulance is offering the class, and once students complete the class and pass the test to get their state license, they'll be hired full time.

"I've always been a public servant," Burr said. "I worked in law enforcement for several years and I've always been interested in helping people -- I just thought the medical side of helping people would be more satisfying."

The company is also looking for licensed EMTs and Paramedics. For more information, visit the company's website.

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