17-year-old Louisville filmmaker getting national attention - WDRB 41 Louisville News

17-year-old Louisville filmmaker getting national attention

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Mark Vogt Mark Vogt
Mark Vogt works on his latest project, East Point. Mark Vogt works on his latest project, East Point.
Mark Vogt works on his shot with Brian Mitchell, his adviser at St. Xavier High School. Mark Vogt works on his shot with Brian Mitchell, his adviser at St. Xavier High School.
Mark Vogt edits most of his projects on his home computer. Mark Vogt edits most of his projects on his home computer.
Mark Vogt sits down with WDRB for an interview in his home office. Mark Vogt sits down with WDRB for an interview in his home office.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- Seventeen-year-old Mark Vogt is working on his latest project, a short film called East Point. It's about two teens trying to survive in a post-apocalyptic world.  

It's just another day for the young man who walked away with four of the six high school student production awards given out at this year's regional Emmys.

"That night, standing on stage, you know I got really nervous, but at the same time, I knew why I was there and I knew what I wanted to say, and I knew that the countless hours sitting at this desk were meant for something like that," Vogt said. 

It was the shining moment in a body of work that dates back to when Mark was in sixth grade and shot a film about a Nerf war. Six years later, the young writer and director is catching attention, with films like The Forgetful Future, which he wrote, shot and edited in just five days.   

Vogt's adviser at St. Xavier High School remembers when Mark helped put together another film on a tight schedule, it got an honorable mention at the White House Student Film Festival.

"He kind of blew me away right from the beginning there, not just with his talent and his eye, but his organizational skills and just everything about the way he goes about a production," Brian Mitchell said.  

One of the very first signs that Mark was interested in the film business came when he was just a kindergartner, and his mom and dad went out and bought him the Star Wars trilogy set on VHS.  His parents say he spent more time watching the behind the scenes footage and interviews than the movies themselves. 

"It taught him that the movies were made and they weren't magic, that somebody created the characters, the story and that is what a film was or what a movie was, that somebody made it that it didn't just happen," Vogt's mom, Kathy, said. 

Mark says making films pretty much consumes his life these days, he edits most of them on his home computer and, he's always thinking about the next project.

"I go to school and in my free time, I'm writing little notes," he explained. "If I think of something, I write it down or I come home and I correspond with different contacts or just to work and write. And on the weekends, we're shooting."

As he begins his senior year in high school, Mark is planning ahead and looking west. He wants to go to film school on the west coast where he's hoping to make some big name connections.

Mark says he hopes to make a feature film within the next ten years, whether a huge spectacle like Star Wars -- or something else.

"As long as it's got really dynamic people inside of it, then it's a great story, and I'd love to shoot a film like that," he said.

Mark says he's most proud of a short film called Echo Trail he recently completed, which he plans to submit it to the Emmys next year.

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