St. Xavier and Trinity High Schools equipping themselves with he - WDRB 41 Louisville News

St. Xavier and Trinity High Schools equipping themselves with heroin overdose antidote

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People attending Wednesday's meeting also learned how to use the drug Naloxone to reverse the effects of a heroin overdose. People attending Wednesday's meeting also learned how to use the drug Naloxone to reverse the effects of a heroin overdose.
St. Xavier High School St. Xavier High School
Trinity High School Trinity High School

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- It's an unfortunate sign of the times.

Two Louisville private schools are now taking steps to fight the heroin epidemic.

The president of St. Xavier High School says there have been no heroin overdoses on its campus, but he says it's wise to be ready for the worst.

When St. X's 1,300 students come back next month, they'll return to a newly-remodeled main hallway and something less obvious.

St. X is now equipped with Naloxone, the heroin overdose antidote.

“To be ready in case there was a need at some time on campus, either with students or with visitors to campus,” said St. X President Perry Sangalli.

Naloxone is given through the nose and has saved lives. So far, five school staff members are trained to administer it.

It demonstrates that no one, not even students at this school, is immune to the heroin epidemic.

“To think that our students aren't exposed to all of that would be naive," Sangalli said. "And to say that young men who are between 14 and 18 years old aren't exposed to everything that's happening in the community also would be naïve."

Trinity High School is also now armed with Naloxone.

President Rob Mullen told WDRB by email: 

“This is another tool we can add to our education, prevention and intervention efforts. It is more a sign that we must stay vigilant and consider best practices as they surface.”

 A spokesperson for the Archdiocese says other Catholic schools are investigating Naloxone as well.

“All of us have to be ready to respond. We have to be proactive in our education, but also have to be ready to respond if a problem should arise,” Sangalli said.

The schools receive a supply of Naloxone and the training free through the Metro Health Department.

It's certainly not the kind of education the founders of St. X could have imagined in 1864.

“One of the things that's important about my job as president of the school is to remain faithful to our tradition, but responsive to the current realities,” Sangalli said.

JCPS says its school resource officers have access to Naloxone.

It is considering expanding training to include school nurses and perhaps others as well.

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