Cab driver paralyzed after west Louisville shooting speaks with - WDRB 41 Louisville News

Cab driver paralyzed after west Louisville shooting speaks with Gov. Bevin

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Abdirahman Mohamed Abdirahman Mohamed

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- More than six weeks after being shot for apparently no reason in west Louisville, Abdirahman Mohamed relived that horrifying and senseless moment when he responded to 32nd Street and Hale Avenue for someone needing a cab.

"When I got there, he comes to my door, and I said 'Is your name Jaden?'  And, he said, 'Yes.'  And, I said, 'Come on in, let's go,'" Mohamed said Monday. 

"He starts shooting with no questions. I mean, I have money in my pocket. If he wanted money, I would have given it to him. I would have given to him even the key of the car and walk away, but, well, I got a lot of questions about that."

Mohammad came to the United States in 2007 to escape the civil war in his native Somalia. June's shooting was the second for him since living in Louisville. He says if he knew the violence he would face here, he would've stayed in Somalia.

"I wouldn't think in my life in America that I would get shot, not even doing something as stupid as dealing drugs," he said. "I'm a father. I got four children. I'm a hard worker, working for my kids."

Now, Mohammed's story has caught the attention of Gov. Matt Bevin and Lt. Gov. Jenear Hampton. On Monday, they and community activist Christopher 2X met with Mohamed at the Frazier Rehab Center where he was moved two weeks ago.  

Gov. Bevin says it's time to try to solve the incredible violence the state is facing, and it starts with a dialogue with everyone involved.

"We're not looking for a Band-aid," Gov. Bevin said. "We're not looking for some lip gloss to put on this. We're looking for what are the real underlying systemic issues within out community ...  and what can happen when people within our community, individuals, people in the health care community and within government, come together."

While his spinal cord injury is called severe and hopes of him ever walking are bleak, Mohamed says he's focused on getting better and providing for his family.  

He says he doesn't think fellow cab drivers should stop working in west Louisville, but he is calling for them to have more protection from police.

"Someone need a cab ride, give it to them," Mohamed said. "But, ask for the government to give more protection, because that's what you deserve."

That gunman is still on the loose, but Yellow Cab is offering a $12,000 reward for information leading to an arrest.  

Related Stories:

Yellow Cab offers reward for information in the shooting of one of their drivers

Somali cab driver shot in Louisville is likely paralyzed, family says

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