LMPD says community cooperation is key to solving city's murders - WDRB 41 Louisville News

LMPD says community cooperation is key to solving city's murders

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Sgt. Emily McKinley Sgt. Emily McKinley

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- The key to stopping a record number of killings in Louisville this year could be you.

Eighty-five people have been murdered in Louisville so far this year, and many of those killers are still on the loose.

That's why LMPD hopes someone will call in tips.

Even if you don't want to help police, they hope you'll want to help family members still waiting for justice and closure.

"I miss my son," said Kenya Tilford, who is the mother of a homicide victim.

A blue cross on Vermont Avenue in west Louisville marks the spot where van Bailey, 21, was shot to death in April of 2014. His killer is still on the loose.

"I know somebody knows something," Tilford said.

Tilford is confident someone knows who killed her son. She says it was on social media before she even talked to police.

"I'm like, whoever put it on social media that quick, they have to know something."

"Most of our cases that are solved, come from help from the community," said Sgt. Emily McKinley with the LMPD Homicide unit.

Sgt. McKinley said detectives are working long hours and have solved more than half the record number of homicides from this year.

"We've cleared 50 of them, so, you know, there are a large number of them that are still unsolved, unfortunately."

Sgt. McKinley said it's not about helping police but instead, it is about helping grieving families.

"Providing justice for that family and providing them with some sort of closure and some sort of answers as far as what happened to their family member."

And police said the department's anonymous tip line, 574-LMPD, is even anonymous to the detectives working the cases.

"There have been times where the tip is so good that I know whoever called this in was there or saw something and I want to talk to that person," Sgt. McKinley said. "And we've tried to say, hey, give me that number, I want to talk to this person again, and there's no way of tracking that."

Meanwhile, Tilford hopes even if you won't break the street's code of silence for police, maybe you'll consider speaking up to help a grieving mother.

"I would like to get down to the bottom of what happened to my son," she said.

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