Controversial Confederate monument being moved to Meade County - WDRB 41 Louisville News

Controversial Confederate monument being moved to Meade County

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LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- The controversial Confederate Monument on Third Street near the University of Louisville will soon have a new home.

Mayor Greg Fischer's office announced Tuesday that the monument will soon be moved to Brandenburg, Ky. 

“This new location provides an opportunity to remember and respect our history in a more proper context,” Mayor Fischer said. “And it’s close enough that Louisvillians can visit."

The process of disassembling it will begin Saturday, Nov. 19. Officials say that will take several days before it is moved to Meade County in a truck.

A time capsule believed to be embedded in the structure will be loaned to the Filson Historical Society for a future exhibit.

The mayor's office says the University of Louisville Foundation will pay to disassemble and move the statue to Brandenburg.

"On Saturday, Second and Third Street will close to traffic, and we'll be bringing in a crane because obviously this monument is very heavy and in multiple pieces," said Chris Poynter with the Mayor's office. "The crane will slowly take the monument down, and once it's down, we'll take it to Brandenberg."

“We are pleased that Louisville Metro and the City of Brandenburg are working to ensure a proper and fitting location for the statue,” acting U of L President Neville Pinto said. “While we do not wish to erase history, the University of Louisville is looking to a future that embraces and promotes diversity and inclusion for all our faculty, students and staff.”

The Brandenburg City Council and the Meade County Fiscal Court will vote Wednesday to accept the monument. The city of Brandenburg plans to build a concrete base for the statue as part of a new riverfront park

Back in June, the city has lobbied to become the statue's new home, touting its strong amount of Civil War history.

The decision on moving the city-owned 70-foot-tall statue comes after months of discussion about its message and place in the community. The statue was erected in 1895 as a memorial to Kentucky soldiers who died for the Confederacy.

Portions of Third Street will be closed during the disassembling process.

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