After losing 3 family members in 2 years, Louisville woman tryin - WDRB 41 Louisville News

After losing 3 family members in 2 years, Louisville woman trying to cope with aftermath of violence

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Priscilla Norment Priscilla Norment
Dequante Hobbs Dequante Hobbs
Brothers Larry Ordway and Maurice Gordon Brothers Larry Ordway and Maurice Gordon

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- It's been a rough couple of years for Priscilla Norment.

First, her teenage cousins, brothers Larry Ordway and Maurice Gordon, were tortured and murdered back in May 2016. Then almost exactly one year later, on May 21, 2017, her grandson, was shot and killed while sitting at the kitchen table of their west Louisville home.

"I don't think he was ready to go, because my daughter said he was crying," Norment said.

Images of blood and a bullet hitting Dequante Hobbs back in May still haunts Norment. The 7-year-old boy died the next day.

"Ever since, it's been so hard," she said. "It's been hard for me to go back to work, but I'm trying my best. And my daughter hasn't been back. But I'm trying. I'm trying." 

As a therapist, Shannon Swinney knows all too well the toll the trauma violence has on those left behind. She's seen a steady increase of traffic at Centerstone's West End Counseling Center.

"You don't expect your child to pass at the age of 5 or 6 or even 10 or 12," Swinney said. "It's just not something you process as a parent.

"We see more violence here than we do at any other side."

According to LMPD's running tally as of Monday, 106 people have killed in Louisville this year. Multiply that by their loved ones or just others living in the community, and Swinney said the impact is astronomical.

"Maybe they're not going to work, maybe they're staying in bed, or maybe they're not engaging in the same activities they used to do," she said. "I think those could be red flags for you to see maybe this is someone who needs more support."

Norment agrees. She started therapy recently.

"At first, I couldn't even talk about my grandbaby," she said. "I just really started trying to talk about everything, but it's still hard.

"With the community praying, it helps. I don't know how I'd do it without my family."

Centerstone's new Trauma Group in west Louisville will start early next year. If you or someone you know needs help, call the Access Line (502) 589-1100.

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