JCPS reviewing its security in wake of Marshall County mass shoo - WDRB 41 Louisville News

JCPS reviewing its security in wake of Marshall County mass shooting

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Two teenagers were killed and 18 others were injured in Tuesday morning's mass shooting at Marshall County High School in southwest Kentucky. Two teenagers were killed and 18 others were injured in Tuesday morning's mass shooting at Marshall County High School in southwest Kentucky.
JCPS Acting Superintendent Dr. Marty Pollio JCPS Acting Superintendent Dr. Marty Pollio
JCPS Chief Operations Officer Michael Raisor JCPS Chief Operations Officer Michael Raisor

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- The school shooting at Marshall County High School on Tuesday morning has many parents in Louisville asking what JCPS is doing to ensure student safety.

JCPS Acting Superintendent Dr. Marty Pollio offered condolences and support to Marshall County Schools on Tuesday.

"It breaks your heart and makes you just want to go help and do anything you can to help the educators and the families of Marshall County," Pollio said.

JCPS said it is constantly reviewing its own security procedures.

"Every incident that happens causes every educator to review and reflect on their policies and their procedures," Pollio said.

JCPS has gone through a shooting of its own. Andre Banks pleaded guilty to shooting another student, who survived, at Fern Creek High School in September of 2014. 

JCPS Chief Operations Officer Michael Raisor said the district made many changes following the shooting but would not get too specific for security reasons. District officials said they work closely with law enforcement reviewing security plans, funds school resource officers and has handheld metal detectors available.

"We have added security measures over the last couple of years and have gotten some increased funding," Raisor said. "There's always more funding needed for security, but our buildings are definitely safer."

Rob Matheu, the parent of a JCPS student, has a friend whose daughter attends Marshall County High School. She was not harmed. but Matheu said districts have a tough trade-off between security and creating a welcoming place for learning.

"I don't want our schools to become a prison where you've got to check everything you own before you walk in the door," Matheu said.

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