Gun safety proposal shot down before it reached Bullitt County F - WDRB 41 Louisville News

Gun safety proposal shot down before it reached Bullitt County Fiscal Court

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Bullitt County Courthouse Bullitt County Courthouse

SHEPHERDSVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- Stray bullets land somewhere, and the ones that came from a neighbor nearly missing David Pryor and his horses behind his Bullitt County home got him all fired up.

"You shouldn't be scared in your own backyard," said Pryor, who ultimately took his concerns to the Bullitt County Fiscal Court. "Bullitt County doesn't have any ordinances at all to prevent anybody from shooting any place they want. The only place that does is Shepherdsville in the city limits."

Fiscal Court asked the county attorney to take a shot at a local gun safety ordinance, specifically targeting the discharge of a weapon. The plan was to bring back a proposal at a meeting in May. 

"We're not going to be able to prevent somebody from discharging a weapon," Bullitt County Attorney John Woolridge said at a Fiscal Court meeting in April. "But we can make it in such a fashion where if you discharge it, you will have the appropriate barriers to keep that bullet from exiting your property." 

Woolridge's proposal never came to light. 

The public fired back this week on social media with a post bashing the move in a group called Bullitt County Today.

"No reason to penalize the rest of us responsible gun owners" said one woman. 

"Fiscal Court is whittling away at your 2nd amendment rights..." another post said. 

As words continued to spread Friday, the ordinance died.

"It's politics," Pryor said. "They don't want to make anybody mad, and that should take precedent over public safety, in my opinion."

The Bullitt County Sheriff's Office, Judge Executive Melanie Roberts' office, Fiscal Court members and county attorney, all declined or failed to respond to a request for an on-camera interview.

A representative for the county attorney said the issues can be addressed by the state's wanton endangerment laws, saying, "It's an issue the Fiscal Court no longer wishes to pursue."

That was disappointing to Pryor, who owns three guns himself. 

"My grandkids ride four-wheelers here in this field. my wife rides horses," he said. "It's going to be too late."

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