GRAPHIC: Police release gruesome body camera footage showing off - WDRB 41 Louisville News

GRAPHIC: Police release gruesome body camera footage showing officers fatally shooting robbery suspect

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(l-r, Officer Benjamin Dean, Officer Joshua Weyer, Officer Kody DeSpain, Officer Joseph Fox) (l-r, Officer Benjamin Dean, Officer Joshua Weyer, Officer Kody DeSpain, Officer Joseph Fox)
Demonjhea Jordan and his mother. (Photo provided by Jordan's family) Demonjhea Jordan and his mother. (Photo provided by Jordan's family)

WARNING: The following link contains extremely graphic and disturbing video, which includes violent imagery and profanity. Viewer discretion is advised.

To view the unedited video released by Louisville Metro Police, CLICK HERE.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- Louisville Metro Police released gruesome body camera video Wednesday afternoon depicting the fatal shooting of a robbery suspect in the Portland neighborhood on Tuesday.

Police were called around noon on April 24 on reports of a robbery at a Metro PCS store near South 26th Street and West Market Street. Officers later found a man matching the suspect's description on North 29th Street near Saint Xavier. That man was 21-year-old Demonjhea Jordan.

LMPD says Jordan shot at officers, and officers returned fire. Jordan was shot and later died at the hospital.

On Wednesday, Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad, along with Lt. Aaron Crowell, head of the LMPD Public Integrity Unit, showed the media body camera video from three officers who were involved in the shooting.

Those officers were Officer Kody Despain, Officer Benjamin Dean and Officer Joshua Weyer.

A fourth officer -- Detective Joseph Fox -- was also involved, but he did not have a body camera.

"Body cameras are not issued to our detectives based on the nature of their work," Conrad explained.

The footage -- which was extremely graphic -- provides three different perspectives on the shooting of Jordan. In the videos, officers fire several shots at Jordan. In one case, an officer fires shots through the front windshield of his vehicle. In all three of the videos, after Jordan is shot, officers congregate around another officer, appearing to think that officer had been shot.

"I'm not shot!" screams that officer in one of the videos, as his fellow officers urge him to get in a patrol car so they can drive him to the hospital. It was ultimately determined that the officer had not been shot.

The video graphically shows the aftermath of Jordan being shot.

"Let me see your [EXPLETIVE] hands! Hands mother-[EXPLETIVE]!" an officer screams at Jordan as he's on the ground after he was shot.

Jordan can be seen lying on the ground. He is turned over by officers and his back can be seen covered in blood. There is blood on his hands as officers handcuff him.

Police also released a still image -- presumably frozen from the body camera footage -- just before Jordan was shot, with Jordan holding what appeared to be a handgun in his hand, pointed at an officer. Another still image, taken after Jordan had been hit, showed him lying on the ground, the gun between his legs.

Crowell said Jordan initially fired at the officers -- and that this was confirmed through "multiple sources," though he declined to specify who those sources were. He said no officers were hit, but one of the police vehicles was hit several times.

When asked whether it conforms to police protocol for an officer to immediately begin shooting through his front windshield before getting out of his car, Crowell said that, "I'm not in a position to discuss protocol" but added that, when faced with deadly force, officers will typically respond with, "whatever opportunity they have at hand, depending on the situation they are faced with."

Crowell said at no point was anyone asked to turn the body cameras off.

"No one cut off any body cameras and that would absolutely be…something that we would have serious issues with," Crowell said. "But that did not occur."

When asked about the sheer number of shots fired by the police officers, Chief Conrad deferred to the department’s use of force policy.

"A couple of things: first off, officers are going to be able to use force -- in this case deadly force -- in order to protect themselves or others from death or physical injury," Conrad said, adding a moment later that, "That said, as you are firing those shots as a police officer, you are going to have to account for those shots."

"Although I can't assume what that officer saw, I have to assume that he did not see any people beyond the suspect, who from his perspective posed that deadly threat," Conrad said.

Stay with WDRB News. We’ll update this story as it develops.

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