PENDELTON, Ind. (WDRB) -- David Camm, a former Indiana State Police trooper, spent 13 years in prison, twice convicted of killing his wife and his 7-year-old and 5-year-old children.

Both of those convictions were overturned before jurors found him not guilty in a third trial in 2013. Charles Boney, identified by prosecutors as a co-conspirator, was convicted in a separate trial and is serving a 225-year prison sentence for the murders of Kim, Jill and Brad Camm. But nearly 18 years after their deaths, Boney maintained during a prison interview this month that he isn't the killer.

"I'm not the one that pulled the trigger," he said. "So I don't feel responsible for anyone's deaths. I want to make that very clear."

Boney started writing to WDRB News earlier this year. He sent several letters and later agreed to an interview, adding that "there is no question I won't answer." 

Boney said he that even though he's innocent, he doesn't regret the place he now finds himself, because it led him to Christianity.

"This interview that I'm doing isn't about me at all," he said. "I don't want anyone to think he's painting a picture of himself that's better than what we think of him or he's trying to gain favor with public opinion or whatever. It's about my Lord and savior, Jesus Christ."

Boney started two groups in prison: Badged Lives Matter and Fellas Empowering Women, aimed at rallying support for the rights of law enforcement officers and women. He said everything he's been through has led him to this place.

"I regret being involved in this case. I really wish I could go back in time, but I don't regret the time that I have," he said. "I wouldn't change it, because it's made me better. It's helped me grow.

"If I hadn't come back to prison, I wouldn't know Christ like I know him."

Those things that led him to the Pendelton Correctional Facility in Madison County are somewhat murky, though. The murders of Kim, Jill and Brad Camm in September 2000 remain shrouded in unanswered questions. For Boney, though, there's an obvious answer.

"David Camm is the killer," he said. "Your killer is walking out there free. He's out there with you ... I think he'll kill again."

Boney said in the nearly 18 years since the murders, he's told five different stories about what happened, all in an effort to stay "out of the mix" and avoid another stint in prison. This story, he said, is the truth.

On the night of Sept. 28, 2000, Boney said he took an "untraceable" weapon to the Camm residence. David Camm showed up, and while they were talking outside, Kim, Jill and Brad Camm pulled into the driveway.

Boney said the car drove into the garage, and David Camm followed it. While the Camm family was inside, Boney said he heard arguing then "Daddy, no!" before the sound of gunshots.

Several things came out in court, including that Boney's sweatshirt was tucked under Brad and that Kim was undressed. Boney's palm print was also found on the car that drove into the garage that night.

He said David Camm put his sweatshirt under Brad and he learned from TV and his discovery that someone had removed Kim Camm's pants. Boney's palm print was also found on the car that drove into the garage that night.

"Well, I clearly leaned in to look to see Brad and Jill," he said. "Once I went in after David Camm, after he tried to fire a shot at me, I ran in after him. I remember tripping over shoes. I remember touching things.

"And then I heard him say. 'You did this,' and I heard him rummaging around in his house, and I just figured he was probably getting a weapon. And at the time, I didn't have my own weapon with me. So I beat feet. I got out of there."

Boney was the prosecution's star witness in David Camm's third murder trial. He told the jury the same version of events.  

"I'm clearly an African American in a predominately white area," Boney said. "I do believe that I think race played a big part in it."

After years of trials, convictions and acquittals, Boney now spends his time behind bars, studying the evidence from his own case every day.

"I'll say boldly that I will be out one day," he said. "I might be 80. I might be 75, 60, who knows. Two-hundred-twenty-five years is not in my future. The good Lord has something planned. He has something in store for me."

Boney said he thinks about the case constantly. He has a picture on his wall of Kim, Brad and Jill Camm.

"There are three beautiful people who are no longer with us, and like I said, I'm not responsible for their actual deaths," Boney said. "But I am responsible in the fact that I didn't do anything about it. I could have easily called 911. I could have went straight to the police department after leaving there ... It would have been a very different story. In fact, I'd just now be getting out of prison.

"I don't expect people to be forgiving and to look past me and think. 'Oh, he's a great guy. Yeah, let's write him or whatever.' It's not going to be that easy, but then again, I'm not looking for it either. All I'm trying to do is impress my Lord and savior. That's all that matters."

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