LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- Colonel Harland Sanders sold Kentucky Fried Chicken's "secret recipe" for $2 million, but he gave a lot of his personal items away.

Now, some of those items are being sold to the highest bidder.

Dick Miller, who was Sanders' driver and travel companion, met the fast food giant during a chance encounter 50 years ago.

"I came out to pick up a carryout and Colonel Sanders was out in the yard," Miller said.

The two men struck up a conversation, and within a few days, there was a job offer on the table.

By 1970, Colonel Sanders had sold KFC and the eleven herbs and spices, but he was busier than ever as the company's brand ambassador and needed a driver and travel companion. From Kentucky, to Texas, Las Vegas and Washington D.C., Miller spent the next 10 years at the colonel's side.

"I traveled a quarter of a million miles a year and saw a lot of KFC stores," Miller said.

On the road, Miller said Colonel Sanders always sat up front and sometimes even took the wheel.

"Even though he had me as a driver, there's times we walked out of the house up here, and he'd get in on the driver's side and buckle up, and he'd do the driving," Miller said.

And some days, the colonel's driving wasn't the only thing that required a seat belt.

"I was either called 'honey' or 'SOB,'" Miller recalled. "He very seldom ever called me by my name."

For ten years, Miller said he was rarely given a day off.

"I got married, and he gave me that day off. He said, 'I'll see you tomorrow morning,'" Miller said. "I said, 'Well, I was going on a honeymoon.' He said, 'You have the rest of your life to consummate the marriage.'"

But the colonel and Mrs. Sanders did give Miller a lot of keepsakes and mementos.

"These are some items that I am going to let go, even though they have been given to me personally," Miller said.

Nearly 40 years after Sanders' death, Miller has decided to part with some of the colonel's personal items, including the trademark white suit, a watch, belt buckle, Stetson hat, state-issued drivers license and credit cards.

"I have two children that if I became room temperature, it would be on eBay," Miller said.

Instead, the items will be sold at auction.

"I'd like to see them go to someone that would appreciate them," Miller said.

Colonel Sanders died on Dec. 16, 1980. After his funeral, Miller drove his boss one last time. He got behind the wheel of the hearse and drove Colonel Sanders to his final resting place at Cave Hill Cemetery.

After Sanders died, Miller spent the next 28 years working at KFC Headquarters in Louisville, Kentucky.

Meanwhile, Colonel Sanders' personal items will be sold by Heritage Auctions. Click here to view the items or place a bid.

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