INDIANAPOLIS (AP) - The Latest on the midterm election in Indiana (all times local):

9:47 p.m.

Indiana Secretary of State Connie Lawson, Auditor Tera Klutz and Treasurer Kelly Mitchell all have won re-election.

The three Republican statewide officeholders all won comfortably Tuesday.

Lawson defeated Democrat Jim Harper and Libertarian Mark Rutherford.

Klutz turned back challenges from Democrat Joselyn Whitticker and Libertarian John Schick.

Mitchell topped Democrat John Aguilera.

9:35 p.m.

Rep. Jackie Walorski has defeated Democrat Mel Hall to win re-election to a fourth term in northern Indiana's 2nd District.

Walorski had easily won her last two re-election campaigns, but political observers believed there was a chance Hall could pull off an upset in Tuesday's general election.

The Methodist minister-turned-health care company executive's campaign had emphasized his experience in business and on health care issues.

Democrats said Walorski was vulnerable, had been absent from the district and out of touch with her constituents. But Indiana GOP chairman Kyle Hupfer said Walorski had worked very hard to hold onto her seat.

The South Bend-area district was a Democratic-leaning district until the 2010 redistricting left it more favorable for Republicans.

9:32 p.m.

Republican businessman Mike Braun has ousted Sen. Joe Donnelly, Indiana's lone statewide elected Democrat, in a race in which both candidates portrayed themselves as fans of President Donald Trump.

It's a victory the GOP has dreamed of ever since Donnelly unexpectedly won in 2012 after Republican nominee Richard Mourdock made incendiary comments about abortion and rape.

However, few would have predicted Braun's win when he entered the race last year. The multimillionaire auto parts magnate was a little-known state representative when he launched his bid.

But Braun used his own wealth to out-fundraise two better known congressmen during a bitter GOP primary that was fueled on personal attacks.

Indiana has elected conservative Democrats but increasingly trended Republican in recent years.

9:02 p.m.

Rep. Trey Hollingsworth has defeated Democrat Liz Watson to win re-election to a second term in southern Indiana.

Political observers had considered the contest between Hollingsworth, a Republican, and Watson the closest of Indiana's House races heading into the general election.

But Hollingsworth on Tuesday bested Watson, a Bloomington attorney who's a former Democratic congressional staffer.

Hollingsworth, the son of a Tennessee business mogul, had moved to southern Indiana's 9th District in 2015, shortly before launching his first campaign.

He cleared a crowded GOP primary field in 2016 thanks to attack ads run by a Super PAC financed by his wealthy father.

The 9th District which extends from the Ohio River to the south Indianapolis suburbs.

8:32 p.m.

Greg Pence, an older brother of Vice President Mike Pence, has won an Indiana congressional race.

The 61-year-old owner of two antique malls had been expected to easily win election to the heavily Republican district seat. His famous sibling held the seat for 12 years before later serving as Indiana governor.

Eastern Indiana's 6th District seat was open because Republican Rep. Luke Messer ran in the GOP primary for the Senate.

Democrat Jeannine Lee Lake, who's the publisher of a bimonthly Muncie newspaper, had received an endorsement from comedian and Indiana native David Letterman in her longshot bid to claim the seat.

Greg Pence, who never has held office, once ran the now-bankrupt chain of Tobacco Road convenience stores. He's one of Mike Pence's three brothers.

8:10 p.m.

Voters have approved an amendment to the Indiana Constitution obligating the General Assembly to adopt balanced budgets unless two-thirds of the members of both chambers vote to suspend the requirement.

The amendment twice cleared the General Assembly after Vice President Mike Pence first proposed it in the 2015 State of the State address when he was Indiana's governor.

Republican Rep. Todd Huston of Fishers sponsored the resolution in the Indiana House. He said the amendment forces lawmakers to fund pension responsibilities and bonding responsibilities.

The constitution already largely banned the state from incurring debt, except in times of war. Under the amendment, the General Assembly would be required to pass a balanced budget unless supermajorities vote to suspend the rule.

6:05 p.m.

A Monroe County judge has ordered polling locations to stay open late in the southern Indiana county following strong voter turnout.

The Herald-Times reports that the judge approved the order Tuesday evening after county Clerk Nicole Brown filed a request. The order directs the county's polling sites to stay open until 7 p.m., an hour after their scheduled closing time.

Brown earlier ordered more ballots delivered to polling sites, telling WISH-TV that Tuesday's turnout was "unprecedented." She urged voters to stay in line after the polls close, saying they will be allowed to vote.

William Ellis is the Monroe County Election Board's Republican representative. He says the locations needing more ballots are in Bloomington, at the Indiana University Memorial Union, a church and two schools serving as polling sites.

4:10 p.m.

The direction President Donald Trump is leading the country in was dominant issue on voters' minds as they cast ballots in the Indiana Senate race.

The neck-and-neck contest between Republican businessman Mike Braun and Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly is one of the most closely watched in the country. It will help determine the balance of power in the Senate, where the GOP currently has a slim 51-49 majority.

Mark Allan, a 50-year-old truck driver from Indianapolis, says he doesn't have anything against Donnelly, but he voted for Braun because he wants to support the president's agenda - particularly when it comes to immigration and foreign policy. He thinks keeping the Senate in GOP hands is the best way to do that.

Janet Pfadt (fad), a 68-year-old retiree from Indianapolis, said she voted for Donnelly because she's troubled by Trump's approach toward immigration and his record on the environment. She believes Republicans, including Braun, are beholden to the president.

3:45 p.m.

Officials in a central Indiana county say lines are moving after they've resolved computer troubles that delayed checking in voters and snarled voting for hours.

Johnson County election board chairman Phil Barrow says officials won't seek an extension of voting hours despite Tuesday's delays. He says the board doesn't feel an extension beyond the normal 6 p.m. closing time is needed because things were running smoothly Tuesday afternoon even though some people left polling sites without voting.

County Clerk Sue Anne Misiniec blamed the trouble on its election vendor's server not being able to handle the traffic as voting ramped up. That left voting machines standing unused in the heavily Republican county just south of Indianapolis.

2:40 p.m.

A judge has ordered 12 polling places in a northwestern Indiana county stay open late after voting didn't start as scheduled.

The (Northwest Indiana) Times reports a Porter County judge ordered the polling sites stay open up to 2-1/2 hours later than the scheduled 6 p.m. CST closing time.

Porter County Clerk Karen Martin says some sites opened as much as 1-1/2 hours late. The Republican clerk blamed that on some expected poll workers quitting, some workers not picking up election supplies and sites not being open when poll workers arrived.

Democratic Portage City Councilman Collin Czilli says several voting sites didn't open on time in that city and called the situation "unacceptable."

2 p.m.

Voting was snarled for hours in a central Indiana county because of what election officials say were computer problems checking in voters.

Johnson County Clerk Sue Anne Misiniec says its election vendor's server wasn't able to handle the traffic as voting ramped up on Tuesday, leaving the voting machines standing unused.

News outlets reported voters stopped in lines for more than two hours before midday in the heavily Republican county just south of Indianapolis.

Indiana secretary of state office spokeswoman Valerie Warycha says no similar problems had been reported from the state's other 91 counties.

Misiniec says she understands the frustrations of voters faced with long lines.

6:15 a.m.

Polls are now open in most of Indiana where Democrats face stiff challenges in the midterm election as they try to hold a U.S. Senate seat and cut into the Republican Party's grip on most congressional seats.

Sen Joe Donnelly is locked in a tough fight with GOP businessman Mike Braun. The race saw two campaign appearances for Braun by President Donald Trump and one for Donnelly by former President Barack Obama in the waning days.

Indiana's nine congressional seats are up for grabs, but only two GOP seats there are considered in play.

Three other statewide races - those for secretary of state, state auditor and treasurer - are also on the ballot. Hoosier voters will also decide whether Indiana's constitution should be amended for the second time in two years.

9:05 p.m.

Indiana Democrats face stiff challenges in the midterm election as they try to hold a U.S. Senate seat and cut into the Republican Party's grip on most congressional seats.

Sen Joe Donnelly is locked in a tough fight with GOP businessman Mike Braun. The race saw two campaign appearances for Braun by President Donald Trump and one for Donnelly by former President Barack Obama in the waning days.

Indiana's nine congressional seats are up for grabs, but only two GOP seats there are considered in play.

Three other statewide races - those for secretary of state, state auditor and treasurer - are also on the ballot. Hoosier voters will also decide whether Indiana's constitution should be amended for the second time in two years.

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